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About

What We Do

Office of Pipeline Safety inspects natural gas, propane and hazardous liquid pipelines, and investigates leaks and accidents. This office enforces the “Call Before You Dig” laws.

Mission Statement 

The mission of MNOPS is to protect lives, property, and the environment through the implantation of a program of gas and hazardous liquid pipeline inspections, enforcement, accident and incident investigations, and education.

 

Vision Statement

The MNOPS vision is to ensure a customer driven approach to public safety through focus on collaboration and continuous improvement.

Staff

The Office of Pipeline Safety has 15 full time employees located in the Saint Paul office.  Additional inspectors are located in our field offices in Fosston and Sandstone.

 

Inspection Program

MNOPS uses a risk-based method for scheduling pipeline inspections. Inspections include an evaluation of the operator's policies, procedures, training and qualification records, along with field observation of practices and conditions. If an accident occurs, the office investigates to determine probable violations and works to prevent recurrence. MNOPS has the authority to issue civil penalties for violations of Minnesota pipeline laws.

 

Damage Prevention Program

MNOPS is the enforcement authority for the "Call Before You Dig" law, Minnesota Statute 216 D.  The MNOPS director also serves on the Gopher State One-Call Board. At least 48 hours before excavating, any individual or company is required to call the Gopher State One-Call Center so that operators can be notified to mark facilities.
 
 

Other

MNOPS partners with the Gopher State One Call Board, local utility coordinating committees and individual organizations to present more than 80 educational seminars on excavation damage prevention each year.  As a result of excellent public-private partnerships that enhance communication, educate excavators and support enforcement of the One-Call laws, excavation related damages in Minnesota have declined by over 70 percent since 1996.